CYTO U Upcoming Webinars
Collapse Expansion Microscopy: Improving Resolution Through Uniform Specimen Expansion

Expansion Microscopy: Improving Resolution Through Uniform Specimen Expansion

Wednesday, May 1st, 2019 at 12 pm EST (US & Canada)

Presented by

Paul Tillberg, PhD

Lab Head

HHMI/Janelia

 

Moderated by 

Stephen Lockett

Principal Scientist,
Director, Optical Microscopy and Analysis Laboratory

Frederick National Laboratory and Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc

About the Faculty

Paul Tillberg completed a B.S. in Electrical and Materials Engineering at UC Berkeley before going on to complete his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at MIT, where he worked on technology development for the biological sciences. In the Boyden group, he conceived, designed, and co-led the development of Expansion Microscopy. He is currently a Fellow/Lab Head at the HHMI Janelia Research Campus, where he continues to develop and disseminate the expansion method in addition to other avenues of technology development for biology.

Webinar Summary

The Expansion Microscopy method improves the effective resolution of any optical microscope by ~4-fold by uniformly expanding biological specimens. Expansion is achieved by embedding the tissue in an ultra-swellable gel, followed by a few simple processing steps. The method is easy to adopt and well-suited as a histology core facility offering, as it is compatible with existing antibody and fluorescent protein labelling protocols without modification.

Learning Objectives

-Discuss how to do expansion microscopy

-Describe the variants associated with expansion microscopy

-Learn the strengths and drawbacks to evaluate expansion microscopy for users' specific applications

Who Should Attend

Any biologist interested in probing the nanoscale structure of fixed tissue. Basic histology and imaging skills are useful for the smooth adoption of Expansion Microscopy.

Formats Available: Live Webcast, Live Webcast + Streaming
Original Seminar Date: May 01, 2019

Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Expansion Microscopy: Improving Resolution Through Uniform Specimen Expansion
    Collapse Platelet Flow Cytometry

    Platelet Flow Cytometry

    Wednesday, July 31st, 2019 at 9 am EST (US & Canada)

    Presented by

    Matthew Linden, PhD

    Associate Professor

    University of Western Australia

     

    About the Faculty

    Matthew is the Associate Professor of Haematology at The University of Western Australia, where is leads the development and delivery of haematology and cytometry education to train hospital scientists. Matthew’s research interest is in platelet biology and function. Working at the interface of the shared resource laboratory, discovery and translational research, Matthew has developed novel cytometry techniques for the measurement of blood platelets and employed these in the development of new antiplatelet therapies. He is committed to advancing cytometry through strong, sustainable shared resource laboratories and cytometry education. Matthew is an ISAC Marylou Ingram Scholar and the current President of the Australasian Cytometry Society.

    Webinar Summary

    Flow cytometry is a powerful and versatile tool which can be used to provide substantial phenotypic data on platelets including surface expression of functional receptors, bound ligands, expression of granule components, signal transduction, platelet-platelet aggregation or interaction of platelets with leukocytes. Quantitative assessment of these parameters may facilitate the diagnosis of inherited or acquired platelet disorders, assist in the diagnosis of diseases associated with platelet activation, or assist in the monitoring of safety and efficacy of antiplatelet therapy.

    Learning Objectives:

    -Discuss the utility of platelet flow cytometry

    -Describe the process by which platelet phenotype and function are measured

    -Discuss the pre-analytical and analytical variables that can affect platelet data

    Who Should Attend

    Clinical and research scientists who wish to measure platelet phenotype and function.

     

    Formats Available: Streaming, Live Webcast + Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: July 31, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: July 31, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Platelet Flow Cytometry
    Collapse Data Analysis Rigor and Reproducility - Part 1 - Experimental Design: Considerations for Rigor and Reproducibility and Computational Analysis

    Data Analysis Rigor and Reproducility - Part 1 - Experimental Design: Considerations for Rigor and Reproducibility and Computational Analysis

    Thursday, August 15th, 2019 at 12 pm EDT

    Presented by 

    Dagna Sheerar, SCYM(ASCP)

    Manager, Instrument Innovator

    University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center Flow Cytometry Laboratory

     

    About the Faculty

    Dagna Sheerar has been working in Flow Cytometry Shared Resource Laboratories since 2000, starting out in the Immunology Services Laboratory of the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center where she assisted in organizing a BSL-3 cell sorting facility.  From there, she went on to manage the Flow Lab at the University of Western Ontario for three years.  In 2006, Ms. Sheerar returned to the University of Wisconsin – Madison to work in the Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Flow Cytometry Laboratory.  In 2011, she was hired as the manager of the UWCCC Flow Lab.  Always an active member in the Flow Cytometry community, Ms. Sheerar is a member of the Steering Committee for the Great Lakes International Imaging and Flow Cytometry Association and a member of the ISAC Shared Resources Laboratory Educational Task Force.  As manager of the UWCCC Flow Lab, Ms. Sheerar focuses on providing researchers with the tools and support to perform rigorous and reproducible flow cytometry assays in basic research and clinical research trials.

    Webinar Summary

    This webinar will outline the steps and considerations in designing a successful flow cytometry assay in the context of basic research and clinical research trials.  We will focus on how best to minimize variables for a robust and reproducible assay, paying added attention to producing data sets well suited to downstream computational data analysis platforms.

    Learning Objectives:

    - Discuss the importance of working with biostatisticians in the early experimental planning stages

    - Describe how to create criteria for sample inclusion/exclusion and building in room for sample loss

    - Learn the importance of validating reagents and proper quality control & characterization of instrumentation

    - Discuss how to create rigorous protocols and the importance of record keeping & annotation

    - Expectations for the design, optimization, and standardization of assays and data analysis pipelines

    Who Should Attend

    - Researchers using flow cytometry assays in the course of their research

    - Shared resource staff supporting researchers in the design, optimization, standardization, and data analysis of these research projects.

    - Computational Biologists and Biostatisticians performing data analyses for large scale flow cytometry based experiments.

    Formats Available: Live Webcast, Live Webcast + Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: August 15, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Data Analysis Rigor and Reproducility - Part 1 - Experimental Design: Considerations for Rigor and Reproducibility and Computational Analysis
    Collapse Data Analysis Rigor and Reproducibility- Part 2 - Analysis Tools

    Data Analysis Rigor and Reproducibility-Part 2 - Analysis Tools

    Tuesday, September 24th, 2019 at 12:00 pm EST

    Presented by 

    Sofie Van Gassen

    VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research

    Moderated by

    Lola Martinez Garcia

     

    About the Faculty

    Sofie Van Gassen (°1990, Lokeren, Belgium) received her M.S. degree in Computer Science from Ghent University in 2013 and her PhD in Computer Science Engineering from Ghent University in 2017. During her PhD, she developed machine learning techniques for flow and mass cytometry data. Since 2018, she is an ISAC Marylou Ingram Scholar, and as a postdoc she is further developing and improving machine learning techniques for single cell data in the DaMBi group (VIB - UGent Center for Inflammation Research).

    Webinar Summary

    Some of the current data analysis tools will be presented, including tools for visualization (e.g. SPADE, tSNE, UMAP), for automated gating (e.g. flowDensity, flowLearn) and for population discovery (e.g. Citrus, FlowSOM, CellCNN). Detailed pros and cons of these methods will be highlighted along with a discussion on how to pick a good tool.

    Learning Object

    -Learn about the dimensionality reduction algorithms, clustering algorithms and population discovery tools.

    -Discuss guidelines and learn how to select which tool is best depending on a given situation.

    Who Should Attend

    People who are wondering which analysis tools they could apply on their cytometry data.

    Formats Available: Live Webcast, Live Webcast + Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: September 24, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Data Analysis Rigor and Reproducibility- Part 2 - Analysis Tools
    Collapse Handling Challenging Samples within an SRL Core

    Handling Challenging Samples within an SRL Core

    Wednesday, October 16th at 12 pm EST

    Presented by

    Nicole Poulton

    Director, Facility for Aquatic Cytometry -- ISAC SRL Emerging Leader 2017

    Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

     

     

    Rachael Sheridan

    Director, Flow Cytometry Core

    Van Andel Institute, USA

     

    About the Faculty

    Nicole Poulton

    Nicole Poulton is Research Scientist and Director of the Facility for Aquatic Cytometry at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, in East Boothbay, Maine.  Her research uses both flow and imaging cytometry to identify and examine viruses, bacteria and plankton from natural environments. She works primarily with samples from natural communities, ranging from lakes and oceans, to hyper-saline ponds, sediments, soil, and mineral rich hot springs. She is an active educator and trains cytometrists, students and scientists interested in learning aquatic and environmental cytometric techniques.  Nicole received her Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology / Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program.

    Rachael Sheridan

    Rachael is the Director of the Flow Cytometry Core facility at the Van Andle Research Institute in Grand Rapids, MI. Her core supports a wide array of biomedical research ranging from immunology and metabolism to neurodegenerative disease and cancer. She works with samples originating from multiple tissue types as either whole cells or isolated nuclei and is always excited to try something new. Before moving to Grand Rapids, Rachael trained at the University of Wisconsin—Madison Carbone Cancer Center Flow Cytometry Core where she discovered her passion for flow cytometry and education.  

     

    Webinar Summary

    Life in a Shared Resource Flow Cytometry Laboratory (SRL) is always dynamic. In addition to routine samples, we are often faced with challenging and unique samples. In research settings these could be anything from subcellular organelles, such as, nuclei and mitochondria, debris-ridden tissue preps, or non-mammalian organisms including plant cells, plankton, as well as, bacteria and viruses. Each of these samples present unique challenges to the SRL cytometrist. In this tutorial we will discuss and present our experiences working with these samples in both a biomedical and aquatic cytometry core facility, and provide some approaches and tips to keep in mind when you confront these types of samples.  We will address some of the following issues:

    • What types of samples can be analyzed by flow cytometry (biomedical to environmental)?
    • Why are SRLs observing more challenging samples?
    • How do operators prepare samples for cytometric analysis?
    • What steps should be considered during instrument setup?
    • Is autofluorescence a friend or foe?

     

    Learning Objectives

    This webinar and discussion will provide participants with a better understanding of how to handle and prepare for different types of samples as the biomedical field expands, and use of a core facility changes.  We will provide a link to a "tips and tricks" webpage addressing how to handle a variety of samples. 

     

    Who Should Attend

    SRL Core employees and researchers interested in working with non-traditional samples within a research or core facility setting.

     

    Formats Available: Live Webcast, Live Webcast + Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: October 16, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Handling Challenging Samples within an SRL Core